The Quadrupeds of North America

The Quadrupeds of North America

Audubon, John James; The Rev. John Bachman

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Price: $15,000.00


Place Published: New York
Publisher: V. G. Audubon
Date Published: 1854-1855
Edition: Early octavo edition
Binding: Leather bound
Book Id: 50272

Description

383; 334; 348pp. Royal octavo [28 cm] Full brown leather with raised bands, and titles and elaborate ornamental designs in gilt and blind on the spines and covers. All edges gilt. Marbled endpapers. The volumes are in good to very good condition, with rubbing to the extremities, and several small cracks at the spine ends along the joints. The text block of volume I has dropped, and is cracked at the beginning. Volumes II and III have a bookseller's small ticket on the front pastedown. The front free endpaper of volume III is detached, but present. The text block of this volume is cracked a couple of times at the center. Volume I has 50 plates. Volume II has 50 plates. Volume III has 55 plates. All with accompanying tissue guards. Occasional light offsetting to the tissue guards. Plate CXLII has a darkened patch in the upper inside margin where a place marker was present (only bleeding ever so slightly into the image).

Comments

An attractive set of Audubon's Quadrupeds of North America, with 155 illustrations after John James Audubon and John Woodhouse Audubon by W. E. Hitchcock and R. Trembly. Lithographs printed by J. T. Bowen (Philadelphia), Nagel & Weingartner (New York). John James Audubon was most known for his monumental double elephant folio illustrations of American birds, published as "The Birds of America," containing 435 hand-colored engravings of 1,065 birds of 489 species. This series, Audubon's second large-scale project, was first published in three folio volumes with 150 plates between 1845 and 1848, as "The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America." Audubon's son, John Woodhouse Audubon, is credited with producing the later plates when his father's health started to decline. The octavo edition, published shortly thereafter in a more convenient size, was meant to reach a larger amount of consumers. "The Quadrupeds of America" is a lovely example of of the type of artistry which brought John James Audubon his fame, illustrating his use of unusually dramatic poses and settings. At the time, naturalist's were accustomed to viewing specimens shown plainly against a blank background. Instead, Audubon attempted to portray animals as he saw them in nature. These infusions of real animal characteristics can be seen throughout The Quadrupeds of America, even in his portrayal of the common house mouse, depicted indoors near a block of cheese and a ceramic vessel (Plate XC, Volume II). A handsome set of this extensive study of North American natural history by the noted American ornithologist and naturalist.



By This Publisher: V. G. Audubon