Paradise Regain'd. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes. John Milton.
Paradise Regain'd. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes
Paradise Regain'd. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes
Paradise Regain'd. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes
Paradise Regain'd. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes
Paradise Regain'd. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes
Paradise Regain'd. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes
Paradise Regain'd. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes

Paradise Regain'd. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes

London: Printed for J. M. Starkey at the Mitre in Fleetstreet, near Temple-Bar, 1671. First edition, second issue. Leather bound. 111; 101pp. Duodecimo [18 cm] Rebacked in calf retaining the original boards and portions of the original cracked spine. Hinges reinforced. Decorative headpieces. In a custom clamshell internally lined with marbled paper. The front pastedown has the bookplate of publisher Nelson Doubleday. Brief inked note on copyright page. Page 67, "loth" corrected from "loah." Errata page with contemporary manuscript notation "Corrected" in brown ink, and the printed text crossed out and all correction administered in fine handwriting on the respective pages in the text. Item #59395

"Paradise Regain'd" is the sequel to Milton's epic poem, "Paradise Lost," which was fashioned after Virgil's "Aeneid." It is similar thematically, in its theological themes and the use of blank verse, though it deals primarily with the temptation of Christ.

"Samson Agonistes," printed with separate title page, is viewed as a tragic "closet drama" meant to be read onstage by one or a small group of actors. Milton invokes Samson, the Israelite warrior, blending Greek tragedy with Hebrew Scripture. By imbuing Samson with traits of other Biblical figures Milton aspired to create a character capable of taking on complex theological issues. This work was written at about the same time as "Paradise Regain'd," and published with it in 1671. However, the precise time of its creation remains a mystery. Following the last page, the "Omissa" with the printed text that was omitted on p. 89, after verse 537, also marked in brown ink on p. 89.

Price: $6,000.00

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